How to Can Peaches the Easy Way!

5 / 5 (5 reviews)

I have a ton of peaches on my trees this year, however, I do not have any room in my freezer to freeze them so it looks like I will be doing a lot of canning. Good thing canning peaches is quick and easy! Today I’m going to show you just how simple it is.

how to can peaches the easy way

Supplies Needed

(Check out the best selling canning products on Amazon HERE).

Step 1 – Select Your Peaches

You will need peaches that are sweet and ripe.  They should not be mushy, but they also should not be rock hard.  Just as ripe as you would eat them fresh. Select varieties of peaches that make the work easier, for example cling-free (also called freestone) peaches are varieties where the pit comes out easily.

Step 2 – Prepare Your Bottles and Lids

Place your jars and rings into a dishwasher on the sterilize setting.  If you don’t have a dishwasher, you can easily place your jars in your boiling water canner and bring the water to a boil for 10 minutes. Place the lids in a small saucepan and heat to a simmer, but don’t boil.

Step 3 – Remove the Skin From the Peaches

Rinse your peaches, then place them into a pot of boiling water and blanch for 30 to 60 seconds. After blanching, place them into a ice water bath to keep them from cooking.

The skins should just slip right off. The beauty of this is that you don’t even need to use a knife! If they don’t slip off, try putting them back into the boiling water for a few more seconds.  If they still don’t slip right off, your peaches might not be ripe.

Step 4 – Cut the Peaches and Remove the Pits

I like to half my peaches, but many people like to quarter them or even slice them.  That is entirely up to how you like to serve them. Cut out any brown spots and mushy areas.

NOTE: Peaches will turn brown when exposed to air, even air in a sealed, sterile jar. To keep the fruit from turning brown, sprinkle 1/4 cup lemon juice or Fruit-Fresh Produce Protector (which is just a mix of citric acid and vitamin C) over a bowlful.  Then stir the peaches to make sure all the surfaces have been coated.

Step 5 – Place Peaches into the Bottles

Put your cut peaches face down (pit side down) in your hot and sterilized bottles.  Fill bottles with peaches to the line of the lip of the bottle (where the curve ends.)  It’s a good idea to pack them fairly tight, without squishing them, they aren’t as likely to float up to the top and turn brown.

Step 6 – Prepare the Syrup

The syrup is just a mixture of sugar and water, you could also use fruit juice.  I like a lighter syrup, I figure my kids get their fair share of sugar without adding it here.  Here is a chart of how much sugar to add for different types of syrup:

Just add the desired amounts and bring the syrup to a simmer in a medium saucepan.

Carefully pour the hot syrup into the bottles until your peaches are covered. Leave a 1/2 inch of space at the top of the bottle. Use a butter knife and carefully slide it down each side of the bottle to remove any air bubbles.

Step 7 –  Put on Lids and Rings

Be sure you use a clean damp cloth to wipe around the rim of your bottle. Then place your lid on top of the bottle and screw on the ring. Careful not to over tighten… you can do that later, once the sealed cans have cooled down.

 Step 8 – Place on the Steam Canner or Hot Water Bath


Place the jars on the Steam Canner careful to avoid the holes or into a hot water bath. Process quarts for 20 minutes + any altitude time adjustments.


Start the processing time when you can see steam coming out of the hole in the lid or in a hot water bath when the water starts to boil.

Lift jars off of the steam canner or out of the hot water bath with a jar lifter and move them to a draft free location and let them cool without touching or bumping (usually takes overnight).   Once they are cooled, you can check that they are sealed verifying that the lid has been sealed.   Just press in the center, gently, with your finger.  If it pops up and down (making a popping sound), it is not sealed.

And there you go! If canned properly, canned peaches should last for 1-2 years… although if your family loves them as much as my family does, they won’t last that long!

How to Can Peaches the Easy Way!

5 / 5 (5 reviews)
Prep Time: 30 minutes | Cook Time: 20 minutes
Yield: Varies | Serves: Varies

Ingredients

  • Fresh Peaches
  • Lemon juice or Fruit Fruit-Fresh Produce Protector
  • Simple Syrup

  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 6 cups Water
  • (yield: 7 cups light simple syrup)

Instructions

  1. Prior to Canning:

  2. Select peaches that are sweet and ripe.
  3. Place your jars and rings into a dishwasher on the sterilize setting.
  4. Place the lids in a small saucepan and heat to a simmer, but don’t boil.
  5. To Can Peaches:

  6. Place rinsed peaches into a pot of boiling water and blanch for 30 to 60 seconds.
  7. After blanching, place them into a ice water bath to keep them from cooking.
  8. Pull the peels off the peaches
  9. Cut the peaches and remove the pits
  10. Cut out any brown spots and mushy areas.
  11. Sprinkle 1/4 cup lemon juice or Fruit-Fresh Produce Protector over a bowl full of peaches (to keep them from going brown)
  12. Stir the peaches to make sure all the surfaces have been coated.
  13. Put your cut peaches pit side down into hot, sterilized bottles.
  14. Fill bottles with peaches to the line of the lip of the bottle (where the curve ends).
  15. You can pack peaches fairly tight, without squishing them.
  16. Carefully pour the hot syrup into the bottles until your peaches are covered.
  17. Leave a 1/2 inch of head space at the top of the bottle.
  18. With a butter knife, slide down each side of the bottle to remove any air bubbles.
  19. Use a clean damp cloth and wipe around the rim of your bottle, place lid and screw on the ring
  20. Place the jars on the Steam canner being careful to avoid the holes or into a hot water bath.
  21. Process quarts for 20 minutes (+ any altitude time adjustments).
  22. Processing time begins once you see steam coming out of the hole in the lid or in a hot water bath
  23. Lift jars off of the steam canner or out of the hot water bath with a jar lifter and move them to a draft free location to let them cool (usually overnight)
  24. Make sure jars aren't touching or bumping
  25. Once cooled, store all sealed cans in long term storage. Any unsealed cans (you'll hear a popping sound when you press on the lid), should be placed in the fridge and consumed in the next few days.
  26. Simple Syrup

  27. Add the desired amounts of sugar for syrup
  28. Bring to a simmer in a medium saucepan.
Ingredients: Granulated Sugar, Lemon Juice, Peach, Sugar, Water
Meal Type: Tips, Summer
Categories: Fruits, Canning & Preserving

Comments & Reviews

  • Christy

    I’m so glad to see articles about canning and encouraging people to try this. I did want to point out a couple of things that I noticed though that are concerning. I am a Master Food Safety Advisor here in Idaho and noticed a few discrepancies with the current USDA recommendations for home canning.

    “Steam Canners are not recommended because processing times for use with current models have not been adequately researched. Because steam canners do not heat foods in the same manner as boiling-water canners, their use with boiling-water process times may result in spoilage.” http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/equp_methods_not_recommended.html

    Also the method sited here is considered a Raw pack which would require 25 min. (plus altitude adjustment) for pints and 30 min. (plus altitude adjustment) for quart jars in a boiling water bath canner. http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_02/peach_sliced.html

    Thanks so much for your website and articles – they are an awesome resource that I use frequently.

  • Kathy Bischoff

    Thank you so much for this, I love canning and its my first year to can peaches. They look beautiful and taste just as good as they look.

  • Lisa

    Thank you so much for these great recipes. This was my first time canning anything. It turned out great and they wonderful. So easy.

  • Celina

    Do you know if anyone has tried to use sweetner instead? I am pre diabetic . Thanks for the great recipe.

  • Rachel

    I i agree with everything Christy said above. Steam canners are no longer considered safe. Also, no need to boil the lids anymore.

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